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  • Email: Stripped
    Date: 03/29/2005

    Comments:

    For cleaning up after using Stazon ink or permanent markers (sharpies), you can use the expo dry erase white board cleaner. It works GREAT!

  • Email: Stripped
  • Date: 04/20/2005

    Comments:

    I found two wall-paper books at the second-hand store for $1.00 each. although I could get some from a decorating store free, I didn't have to wait until they were out of style.

  • Email: Stripped
    Date: 04/22/2005

    Comments:

    The printing company printed the wrong address on our business envelopes and were to be discarded. These were very nice white linen paper. I took them home, cut off the end without the printing with decorative and straight edge cuts and made pockets of them. I embellished with inks, stamps and various other things and attached them to my cards. They hold all types of little goodies. With some I cut windows to show what was inside. My motto is never, never throw away what could become something new.
     

  • Email: Stripped
    Date: 5/4/05
  • Comments:

    Save the corrugated inserts from boxes of perfume or aftershave for layering, some are coloured but mostly white - all different sizes.


    Email: Stripped
    Date: 5/3/05

    Comments:

    I use the stiff cardboard that comes as protection in many mailed items. I save it and when I have something to mail and I want it protected, I cut a piece the size I need and insert it in the packate. Voila'! Better than bubble wrap cause it is free! Also, Dollar Tree here in Atlanta has a whole lot of stickers: bright, pretty, humorous, etc. They are perfect for the kids or for your card and scrapbooking ideas. As someone else has said, Dollar Tree is a cheap place with wonderful stuff. And...Gum comes wrapped in foil, at least I think it still does; anyway, we used to peel the paper wrapping from the foil wrapping. I think that foil would be fun to work with. And cheap especially if you are a gum chewer. I used to have a problem with the paint colors we would find at the paint store. But Sunday, I was at Lowe's and they have a newer example of paint colors. It is larger and doesn't have the number or the color or anything else to get in the way of using it for your cardmaking or scrapbooking. I got several of them. Can't wait to use them. That's all for now.
     


  • Email: Stripped
    Date: 03/11/2005

    Comments:

    I visited a craft shop recently and saw some tiles which you could use to stamp on, approx 1" square maybe less. They had little shards of gold through them and looked very pretty, but were about 2.50 (sorry don't know the exchange) for 10!!!! However, after visiting a local DIY store, I managed to find a whole sheet of 100 mosaic tiles for 1.50. The sheet contained multi colour tiles and shades. To add the gold fleck effect, I simply use a small scrap of sponge to dab fine lines across using gold ink. Hey Presto...100 tiles ready to use for a fraction of the price.. Hope this helps?

  •  
    Email: Stripped for privacy reasons
    Date: 03/04/2005

    Comments:

    jewelry tools such as needle nose pliers and wire cutters etc can be bought at the 99 cent store. Also I found some really good pens and markers at the 99 cent store as well as Glitter glue and glitter gel pens. You can also find some really cute push pins for bulletin boards and cut off the pin and just use the head as embellishments. for $10.00 I can get about $60- $100 worth of craft and stamping equipment. I have also found a craft supply store that sells ribbon from 5-15 yards for $1 these stores usually serve the wholesale community but will sell to anyone. small sheer drawstring bags are 10 for $1.50 I have seen those at Jo Anns or Michaels at 5 for $2.59 One such store is the Fabric Barn in Long beach Ca.
     

     
    Email:
    Date:
    07/28/2004

    Comments

    Get a bottle of Future floor wax - use instead of Diamond Glaze to adhere tissue to the back of your acetate reverse-collages; put some in a spray bottle and add Pearl Ex, or add some to a dedicated water brush and use it to paint the Pearl Ex on - no need to seal! Rubber Gasket from Home Depot (less than $1.00)- draw or transfer a simple image and cut out with scissors, can be scored somewhat with an exacto knife if you wish. Make some more simple images (great fillers) with eraser carving - try it - it's not hard! Keep coffee filters and Swiffer sheets near at hand - I use the filters under anything when I dump on embossing powder, pearlex or glitter, then to return it easily to the container use one of the pleats as a spout. Use a Swiffer cloth for stray glitter, etc on worktable or card. I also use the filters alot to place over my card as I press down layers(o heat set the glue with my hand. I can see through the filter, keeps cardstock clean, and it seems to absorb stray glue on the edges without streaking the cardstock. Final "non-stamping" favorite: I have two 12" floor tiles from Home Depot - one under my work area for a more solid surface (somewhat spongy card table top)- just don't hammer on it! And the other I use for polyclay, with a piece of that non-slip carpet stuff under it - easy to clean and keeps me off my counter top - you can move it into the refrigerator if your clay gets too sticky.


    Email:
    foliver17@yahoo.com
    Date:
    07/14/2004

    Comments

    Dollar Tree has this Dish rack ( make sure to get the smaller one). You can stand it up, leaning it againist thewall and you can store your Stampin Up Ink pads in the slots. It can hold I think 9 or 10. Franz Oliver Stampin' UP Demonstrator foliver17@yahoo.com


    Email:
    sprklz@bigpond.com
    Date:
    07/06/2004

    Comments

    Any old "el cheapo" hairspray works exactly the same as the more expensive "fixative" - just spray it over a glittered area to stop it falling off every time it gets touched; works to hold chalks; forget gum arabic, just use the pearlex and spray with hairspray - even smells ok!


    Email:
    Date:
    06/20/2004

    Comments

    Save those berry baskets! I store my unmounteds, ribbon spools, and wire spools in berry baskets lining a shallow roll out drawer. They are great!


    Email:
    tucsongal99@aol.com
    Date:
    05/24/2004

    Comments

    Wow what great ideas..here is one I have used. I have tons of unused X-stitch material. I spray painted some with Metallic copper spray paint from Michaels..also silver. I cut this and used as background material. The copper color looks especially nice for Southwest stamps. I did not stamp directly onto the material...just for backgrounds.I love the look.


    Email:
    morapples@hotmail.com
    Date:
    05/22/2004

    Comments

    while saving candy wrappers for future projects be sure to check out Hershey Kisses foil wrappers they come in a great varity of colors. You can use them to cover frames , like gold leafing sort of. and use them for various background projects.Stamp on them with staz on ink. You can also stamp on velumn, clear acetate, shrink plastic, ect. and back it with foil.


    Email:
    paperwhitetulip@yahoo.com
    Date:
    05/22/2004

    Comments

    While having the munchies ..I was eatting Creme Savers Soft Candy /strawberries and creme and noticed the wrappers..otherside of wrapper has bright silver! I ate half the bag and saved all the tiny wrappers and will use them for a future project...Anyone got any M&M's? (wink)


    Email:
    antje1@yahoo.com
    Date:
    05/03/2004

    Comments

    For really badly stained rubber stamps, I found that baking soda with a little hot water, applied with a toothbrush, will help in most situations.


    Email:
    robinpellor@yahoo.com
    Date:
    02/13/2004

    Comments

    My idea is similar to another but when you go to the home remodeling type stores go directly to the paint area. They often have square samples and now they have some that are textured and and have lines already in them in so many beautiful colors! Use those for precuts to stamp on for layers or background colors! The best part is that this is free paper!!!!!!


    Email:
    townleydt@vrc40.navy.mil
    Date:
    02/04/2004

    Comments

    take all of your wife's change out of her purse when she's asleep.


    Email:
    klrfarm@cvtel.net
    Date:
    01/26/2004

    Comments

    Oh, and by the way . . . Those little sample chips of countertop at your favorite home builder stores are excellent stamping surfaces for stazon type inks. There's already drilled and make cute pins & tags. Lauri


    Email:
    klrfarm@cvtel.net
    Date:
    01/26/2004

    Comments

    LOVE THIS SITE! But, I hate foam core. Many, many, many of my cards and scrapbook embellishments are shaker boxes of some sort. I even shake my photos. I use foamie. Either 1-2 thin sheets or one 6 mm sheet that I run through my die cutter or sizzix. When I cut foam core, I get shivers like fingernails on a chalkboard but foamie is silent and forgiving. If I want it a little smaller than my window opening, I've heated it on a cutting board with my embossing gun and it draws back a bit. Sorry to ramble on... Lauri


    Email:
    Date:
    01/19/2004

    Comments

    I scan in old hankies with pretty things embroidered on them and use clip art that I have scaned in for a vintage look.


    Email:
    suzansd@comcast.net
    Date:
    01/16/2004

    Comments

    You can buy double stick foam tape at a glass store. You get a huge roll for about $5.


    Email:
    tina@adirecto.com
    Date:
    01/15/2004

    Comments

    At christmas cut the box the crackers come in for glossy gold silver or coloured card, this often has stars etc on it. Also keep any 'motifs' that are attched to the cracker, they look great on cards. If you purchase the more expensive cracker the cardboard the cracker is made from is often glossy gold or silver and can be used for cutting small or oblong card.


    Email:
    tina@adirecto.com
    Date:
    01/15/2004

    Comments

    Keep old birthday,get well and xmas cards. These are often highly coloured and glittered. Cut out any little pictures (you can get many from one card) You often get a miniture picture of the front of card on back. Cut with shaped edge scissors and use for 3D or layered effect. Cut carefully the 'poem' inside which is often in silver or gold for use. I have a large stock of these 'Pictures' and poems for use.


    Email:
    Date:
    09/10/2003

    Comments

    Another light box idea...i bought a touch light at the $1 store and put in under my clear Pyrex brownie dish...just have to avoid the raised info on the bottom.


    Email:
    resqmeb4@aol.com
    Date:
    08/04/2003

    Comments

    I work at an eye doctors offie and we get some great advertisement from manufactors, I use the id tags from frames Glossy PAPER yahhoo,silver paper, great name papers, fossel,kate spade, etc. ladies you'll find tons of great papers at work, insurance binders, dividers are usually glossy paper, veliums,safe those manila folders!!!!!!! make great card stock, use your ink pads -- dircet to paper method and you have custom paper!!!!!! repair tool kita were order, when empty make great storage for eylets, reuse those small eye glass cleaner pump bottles clean out use for mixing paint and water or bleach, you now have mini spray bottles. O yes go thru your work, spouses work, the paper that is tossed is amazing, the windows envelopes that CD come with great for using as card or to send thru mail with you card in side.


    Email:
    sandiec@iprimus.com.au
    Date:
    07/31/2003

    Comments

    Want to make some shadow stamps that are already cut into nice shapes, then use make up sponges made of compressed foam and mount onto wood to make cheap shadow stamps. In Oz, you can get 5 shapes, there are three of each in a pack at Woolies. Glue to wood using Selleys Quik Grip.


    Email:
    crafty_kiwi@hotmail.com
    Date:
    07/30/2003

    Comments

    How many of us through out our film canisters when we get our photos developed??? I use them for beads and any small craft items I have. They are wonderful! I mark on the lids what is in them. :-) Happy stamping :-) Kiwi


    Email:
    greydor5@yahoo.ca
    Date:
    07/23/2003

    Comments

    I took old business cards home that were being thrown out and were a nice beige color. They are great for stamping or decorating on the back side and attaching to other cards.


    Email:
    kansas_3@msn.com
    Date:
    07/14/2003

    Comments

    hello i use old calendar pages and make envelopes out of them. try to find ones that have good picture in the begining of the year and if i find some good ones that is that they are free hand out ones, i go back and get more so that i will have them when i need to make more. nora


    Email:
    Date:
    06/22/2003

    Comments

    Light box booster. There are several great ideas already posted for making light boxes. I found a really inexpensive one at a stamping convention for $13. But I had 2 "issues" with it. #1 The light wasn't bright enough. So, I took a piece of cereal box cardboard the same size as the bottom of the light box & covered it with aluminum foil shiney side out. I taped the foil in place & put the whole sheet under the light box. Result? Double the brightness! #2 Paper kept sliding off the end of it. So, I took 2 popsicle sticks and put double stick tape on one side of them & stuck them directly on to the light box. This would work really well with a little ruler. Final result? It all looks pretty tacky, but it works great!


    Email:
    Date:
    06/22/2003

    Comments

    Light box booster. There are several great ideas already posted for making light boxes. I found a really inexpensive one at a stamping convention for $13. But I had 2 "issues" with it. #1 The light wasn't bright enough. So, I took a piece of cereal box cardboard the same size as the bottom of the light box & covered it with aluminum foil shiney side out. I taped the foil in place & put the whole sheet under the light box. Result? Double the brightness! #2 Paper kept sliding off the end of it. So, I took 2 popsicle sticks and put double stick tape on one side of them & stuck them directly on to the light box. This would work really well with a little ruler. Final result? It all looks pretty tacky, but it works great!


    Email:
    dartistj@juno.com
    Date:
    06/01/2003

    Comments

    When you cut paper with the fancy scissors you can use the little pieces to glue on the envelope or add to the front of the card. Very cute.


    Email:
    petamwau@yahoo.com.au
    Date:
    05/20/2003

    Comments

    Lightboxes...look around for a clip board made from clear plastic...you can use a large square torch to prop it at an angle for working..and every body has a torch! Look around for reasonabley priced stationary...I use this to line my cards using the theme of the stationary for the front of the card...and you have a ready made envelope to match too...eg...I have dolphin stationary which i have matched with embossed shape of dolphin on an interesting back ground...using paper punches, glitter and sand with jak paper... Peta


    Email:
    Amanda@bockris.com
    Date:
    05/10/2003

    Comments

    Save those long twist ties that are used to hold toys into their packages....strip the plastic off them and use with beads, etc.


    Email:
    jibblets@msn.com
    Date:
    04/24/2003

    Comments

    I love this idea board! Great tips. Here are the one's I've discovered over the past few years. ------------------------------------------- SPICE RACK: Reuse an "old" rotating spice rack (w/clear bottles). Perfect for small items like micro beads, confetti, etc. CHEAP GLITTER GLUE: In a small airtight container, mix Aleene's CLEAR tacky glue & a small amount of ultra fine irridescent glitter. To make colored glue, add a drop (or less) of re-inker fluid. You can also add PearlEx or Powdered Pearls. Apply with brush or put in a bottle with a tip. CHEAP PEARLY POWDERS: Too cheap to buy Powdered Pearls??? Look in the cosmetic section of discount stores (Family Dollar). Anything that is made of TALC & MICA that looks powdery & shimery can be used like Powdered Pearls. I found a package of 3 little bottles of powder for $1! Also look for cheap cosmetic brushes to apply these shimmery powders. Pressed powders can be re-powdered by scraping it with a toothpick into a small container. CHALK SUB: Cheap eyeshadow makes a great chalk substitute for the "financially impaired". You can find compacts with multiple colors for real cheap. EMBELLISHMENT STORAGE: Use clear compartmental vitamin containers to store eyelets, brads, etc. PAINT STAMP PAD: Use a few layers of felt, work paint in until it stamps how you like it. DRYWALL MESH TAPE: This one is fun! Can be used as a layering embellishment, brayered & embossed, or just sponge brayered (remove the tape for a reverse pattern). It has just enough tackyness to be removeable or to stay somewhat perm. Use those useless "hanger straps" from new clothes (the loops you have to cut off) as a fiber embellishment. If a gift bag rips beyond reusing, salvage the handle & any other part of the bag that can be reused. Paint or emboss old puzzle pieces. Cut off the point of thumbtacks & hot glue to centers of flowers, etc. I have found MANY cheap, but neat, ideas just browsing through the office supply section of Big Lots or dollar stores.


    Email:
    cherylh@up.net
    Date:
    03/28/2003

    Comments

    The Cheapest Mono-Adhesive you'll find is at the Dollar Store in the Tool Area. It's called Carpet Tape and it's worth its weight in gold. To use it, Cut thin strips and apply to piece that you are adding by pressing down smoothly & firmly around the edges. Then just peel the other side up and press into place - It will not easily move again, so make sure it's in the right spot.


    Email:
    lhine@socket.net
    Date:
    03/25/2003

    Comments

    For cleaning stamps. I keep a small spray bottle with water and a teaspoon of vegetable oil in it. Shake it and spray it on and wipe stamp off.


    Email:
    Date:
    02/17/2003

    Comments

    I have something to share if you deem it worthwhile:   Since double sided tape can be "pricey,"  I use double sided carpet tape which I buy at hardware stores or even the hardware department of WalMart, etc.   It only costs about $4 for a roll which is yards and yards long and about 1-1/2 inches wide.  You just cut it to size and it goes a long way and holds things down really well.  When your scissors get gunky, just use some baby oil or goo gone to clean them.    -- Luci Maestas

     

    Email:
    lynne_fla@msn.com
    Date:
    01/27/2003

    Comments

    I use the liner paper of envelopes. I save them and punch out shapes while I watch TV. I keep them sorted in an egg carton. I always have a good supply of confetti and embellishments.


    Email:
    little_miss_short_one@yahoo.com
    Date:
    01/24/2003

    Comments

    I have a web site that I created, it has many,many,many things, to try, look at and links to my fave sites! Check it out: http://www.expage.com/sotstampers


    Email:
    Date:
    12/03/2002

    Comments

    Baby wipes are great for cleaning your stamps - but make sure to use alcohol free wipes!


    Email:
    Rileybubbalou@aol.com
    Date:
    11/20/2002

    Comments

    Removing shanks on decorative buttons for crafting? I have seen products for 19.95 listed for just this purpose, but I discovered an old nail clipper works just great!


    Email:
    meberly@kconline.com
    Date:
    08/19/2002

    Comments

    My version of a rubber scrubber! I have mounted a painting pad (the bristle type) on top of my travel baby wipes container with double stick tape, after I snapped off the curved ends of the pad. When it is time to clean my stamps I open the lid and dab my stamp on the wet wipes then close the lid and scrub it clean. The small travel size fits in my 'to go' kit nicely. Cleaning stained stamps! I found a way clean dark ink off your stamps by accident on day. I was going to stamp several cards using my versamark pad. I stamped the first background with a previously stained stamp and then set the stamp back on the versamark pad to await the next card. When I went to stamp the next card the the blue stain had loosened up and stamped on my card. So now if I have a stamp that needs some extra cleaning I give it a quick stamp on my VM pad then let it set aside off of the pad to loosen then clean as usually. I also have a question. I would like a recipe for stamp cleaner, like the type in a bottle with a small scrubber top. You have to use this type of cleaner to clean off versamark ink good. - thanks Deb


    Email:
    itsawonderjmcb2000@yahoo.com
    Date:
    06/21/2002

    Comments

    I use an old confectioners sugar shaker and dump all the excess ep (embossing powder) into it. I have several, one for blues, greens, blacks and so on and so for.. So then I add some holographic ep to it.. And there is a brand ep for you to use..JoAnn


    Email:
    phoenix@midrivers.com
    Date:
    06/03/2002

    Comments

    I'm a HUGE Storage fan, always looking for new and inventive ways to store my stuff. Well, Costco and Sams both (most of them) currently carry a tackle box by Plano. Sounds ordinary, yes, but this thing has infinite space! It's $14.95 or something like that and has three internal plastic cases suited for long items (paintbrushes, pens, & longer) and small things (beads, rocks, gems, etc) and two different top storage compartments, one of which is very large for those hard-to-store items. Between the internal plastic cases (which are air-tight practically, nothing will fall out ever), theres space for scrapbook paper and other flat sheet type items. Anyhow, enough rambling. I just found this thing incredibly useful for the price. Something similar at JoAnns would cost $30+.


    Email:
    twocreativehands@juno.com
    Date:
    05/23/2002

    Comments

    It's not an idea, but I saw some things done with a rubber that is called, "Magic Rubber" Anyone know where to get this stuff? You use a heat gun to soften it for about 30-40 seconds and then take either a rubber stamp or any object to press onto the soften rubber. Then you can ink as usual and reuse and reuse over and over.... Thanks in Advance, Cheryl


    Email:
    twocreativehands@juno.com
    Date:
    05/23/2002

    Comments

    It's not an idea, but I saw some things done with a rubber that is called, "Magic Rubber" Anyone know where to get this stuff? You use a heat gun to soften it for about 30-40 seconds and then take either a rubber stamp or any object to press onto the soften rubber. Then you can ink as usual and reuse and reuse over and over.... Thanks in Advance, Cheryl


    Email:
    nancyglaspie@yahoo.com
    Date:
    05/23/2002

    Comments

    Home Depot has a briefcase like case which holds 48 stamp pads for only 9.95. It has an opaque lid w/ an orange slider lock and a handle. Can be stored flat or on end. Very convenient


    Email:
    grafxchick@hotmail.com
    Date:
    04/26/2002

    Comments

    Another great recycle tip... Use pages from old magazines to make inner envelopes for your cards. Floral garden pages are so pretty! Debby Daudelin the grafxchick@hotmail.com Join my community and check out my site! http://communities.msn.com/RubberStampChick


    Email:
    grafxchick@hotmail.com
    Date:
    04/26/2002

    Comments

    I work for a company that uses greenbar (only ours is plain white) paper. It's the large stuff. Well, tons go into the recycle bin. They are ends and can't be used. I take piles of this stuff home and use it in pads for stamping on. All my friends love it! You can practice your layout on it to see if the colors look good, you can fall off your page and not worry about stamping on your table. I've even used it for making my own envelopes! If you have a source... get some and try it! Debby Daudelin the grafxchick@hotmail.com Join my community and check out my site! http://communities.msn.com/RubberStampChick


    Email:
    snphorn@gnt.net
    Date:
    04/02/2002

    Comments

    Wow, lots of great tips here, thanks ladies! Here are two of my faves: Find out when contractor or architect pals clean out their blueprint stashes, and offer to haul them away. This huge paper is great to protect your work surface, to practice drawing or painting BIG, or to cut up smaller and use for scratch paper. My kids have it on their easel and I have all work surfaces covered with it in my studio. Use old silck magazines or catalogs when collaging. Paint your glue all the way past edges of item to be affixed, and after gluing it on, turn the page in the catalog or magazine to a fresh one. I used to use old newspapers for this and my fingers and artwork would get smudgy--slick paper solves that, and magazine/catalog size is a lot easier to deal with. Susan


    Email:
    Date:
    04/02/2002

    Comments

    My hubby recently rescreened our screens with the limp plastic (not metal) screen cloth. This makes fantastic backgrounds!


    Email:
    lyss710@peoplepc.com
    Date:
    03/22/2002

    Comments

    Old cassette tape holder units make great storage for stamp pads. Since cassettes aren't very common any more, you can often find cassette tape holders very cheap at garage sales (or maybe even in your own basement). Also, check hardware stores for carrying cases for stamp pads, wheels, handles, markers, etc. The flat units with a handle that people can use to sort screws and other small items in often work great for this purpose. I found a great carrying case for my stamp wheels, handle and inks at a local superstore (Meijer) for only $5.99.


    Email:
    rowbear@citlink.com
    Date:
    03/12/2002

    Comments

    Since I am a beginner to this stampning world. All my friends have really great stamps which I can't buy yet. I borrow their stamps, emboss alot of thw words or images, and save them for whrn I need them for my cards.


    Email:
    judy@ broomhurststudios.fsnet.co.uk
    Date:
    03/06/2002

    Comments

    Our local picture-framing service sells offcuts of mountboard [great for embossed tiles] - but if you go round the back, there's stacks of the stuff, albeit odd shapes, for free! I now have a huge stockpile of offcuts in case they wake up to the fact that they could make some money out of me!


    Email:
    sueravey@hotmail.com
    Date:
    03/03/2002

    Comments

    I use the old calendar pages from my desk blotter to stamp on. They are large and keep my tabletop clean.


    Email:
    Date:
    02/11/2002

    Comments

    Cheapskate textured stamps: Crayola makes a product called Model Magic (look in the kids' department). It comes in foil packs for about $3. Pinch some off, press it onto a textured surface, and let it dry overnight. The clay stays flexible (think of a dried marshmallow) and takes paint and ink very well. Once they dry, you can cut them into shapes with a pair of scissors or a tiny cookie cutter. You can make lots of stamps from one packet. When drying, don't let the pieces touch, or they will meld together.


    Email:
    mallelu@yahoo.com
    Date:
    01/29/2002

    Comments

    Don't have the colour ink pad you want? Smear some acrylic paint on a pad of paper towel and ink your stamp with this. Immediate clean up is essential - but the paints are much less expensive than the ink pads. I use this method especially when I want a metallic colour - works just fine. I can also brayer on coloured metallics using this method.


    Email:
    aduran1@twcny.rr.com
    Date:
    01/27/2002

    Comments

    Best source for blank rubber to make your own shadow stamps, or run through an Accucut for some great shapes---------Home Depot sells plumber's gasket 6x6 inches for 91 cents.


    Email:
    dfrank@mail.ultraweb.net
    Date:
    01/23/2002

    Comments

    Save those little plastic bases on your daily tear off calendars. They make GREAT easels to disply your art, cards, etc.


    Email:
    taunia1@yahoo.com
    Date:
    12/27/2001

    Comments

    After Christmas, I was cutting up all the cardboard stuff surrounding the kids toys. OMG!!! Do you realize what great glossy card stock you can get from this? I have about 15 or more projects I can make with this! Also the strong cardboard is great for shaker cards ~{:)

    Email:

    mblum1@msn.com
    Date:
    12/10/2001

    Comments

    I have been so frustrated with Gel Pens..I love them and the idea of them, but no matter which ones I buy, they clog!! I got the idea the other nite to try some Goop Off!! It worked!! You can either put a little in a cup and let just the tips soak, or put some on a rag and clean the tips. It didn't work on all of them, but 90% of them!! Beats throwing them out!! They do give good detail... Hope this helps someone as frustrated as I was!! We need to be HAPPY stampers!! Marsha Blum


    Email:
    inkerdoodler2@prodigy.net
    Date:
    12/09/2001

    Comments

    Cheapskate binder and finish: Future Floor Finish is perfect for rubbing over a finished polymer clay pin and also works great for acetate cards! Stamp image in black on the front of the acetate and heat-set, then flip it over and pour a puddle of Future on the back and mush it around with your fingers. Then sprinkle various colors of Pearl-Ex and gently spread them around. Crumple up a piece of white tissue paper and lay it over the Pearl-Ex and let dry. Finished art looks like foil! Sandy Franklin


    Email:
    Date:
    11/24/2001

    Comments

    Cheap storage! The bottom of a Velveeta cheese box is a great way to store your stamp wheels. I can fit 6 in a box. Anne


    Email:
    Date:
    10/27/2001

    Comments

    Here's a site with some free clipart and free fonts to download.http://www.pccrafter.com/freebies.html


    Email:
    jmsowin@execpc.com
    Date:
    10/16/2001

    Comments

    Save those broken cassette tape cases. the side shaped like an "L" makes a great mouting block for mosaic stamps. they also work well for making your own stamps buy gluing misc. stuff like paperclips and string etc.. in unique designs. The little lip works great for holding onto your new stamp.


    Email:
    jmsowin@execpc.com
    Date:
    10/16/2001

    Comments

    When you or someone change careers what to do with all of the left over business cards? SAVE THEM - the unprinted side is perfect for stamping on and using on cards etc... for a gift tag just glue a piece of paper on the printed side for your "To and From". The colors are endless but mostly off white linens and white - perfect for stamping and layering.


    Email:
    printwoman@yahoo.com
    Date:
    08/21/2001

    Comments

    Mosaic Stamp--FREE!! Mount your own stamps? Save the discarded rubber (complete with the foam backing attached, cut them in random geometric shapes and glue them in a random pattern on a jar lid or on the bottom of any surface in a mosaic pattern. Makes a lovely background stamp (similar to a shadow stamp!)


    Email:
    Dacy53@aol.com
    Date:
    07/30/2001

    Comments

    I made a holder to use while embossing with UTEE by taking an old paintbrush and attaching an aligator clip to the end where the brush used to be. Works great, cost about 15 cents.


    Email:
    stampinit@earthlink.net
    Date:
    07/22/2001

    Comments

    Use baby wipes to clean your stamps and let the resulting colored paper dry for cool background paper. Also, if you are not too squeamish, you can put "used" wipes in the washer and use them all over again to clean your stamps. While they are still damp, but them back in the container. If they dry, dampen them with stamp cleaner or plain water.


    Email:
    luvleathers@austarnet.com.au
    Date:
    07/10/2001

    Comments

    Cheapskate Embellishments: Charity run thrift stores (here in Australia we call them Lifeline or St Vinnies) usually have an ample supply of ear rings, bead necklaces etc. Sometimes I have even bought a handful of jewellery stuf for 50 cents! Just break the back off the ear ring and glue it onto card. I have also found great fibers in their miscellaneous bits and pieces.


    Email:
    rek1012@yahoo.com
    Date:
    06/25/2001

    Comments

    The box from a 20 oz. box of Jelly Belly jelly beans is useful to stampers. I use both the top and bottom of the box to store stamps (just the right height). I label the edge with what is in the box and stack them, open, one on top of the other. THe plastic insert with 40 little compartments that held different flavors of jelly beans is great for storing beads, buttons and other embellishments. It has a clear plastic lid that sits on it. OR, forget stamping and use the plastic insert to store your earrings!! Best price on this box of jelly beans is $8.99 at T. J. Maxx. ronnie


    Email:
    echoacre@hotmail.com
    Date:
    06/22/2001

    Comments

    I made a stamp aligner out of a clear plastic cassette case. I just took it apart, laid it flat on the table, and glued it in an L shape. Viola! I can align my stamps when stamping.


    Email:
    echoacre@hotmail.com
    Date:
    06/22/2001

    Comments

    Another option of lighting a light box is by using one of those touch lights they sell for closets that operate on batteries. They are even small enough you can use more than one if they are not bright enough. I heard they work real well for this.


    Email:
    istamp@hotmail.com
    Date:
    06/21/2001

    Comments

    Lightbox - take two 8 x 10 pieces of picture frame glass and one piece of plain paper. Sandwich the paper between the two sheets of glass and run a narrow band of duct tape around the pieces of glass. Use a compact under-the-counter fluorescent light fixture. I use four large old antique blocks to balance the glass above the light fixture. Wood scraps would do just fine. The plain paper keeps the light from being too bright and the glass makes a great cutting surface.


    Email:
    sugarmouse@globully.worldonline.co.uk
    Date:
    06/02/2001

    Comments

    Baby talc makes excellent anti-static powder. Sprinkle some onto a flat surface (saucer, lid from empty ice-cream tub etc) then using a cotton wool ball, pick up a small amount of talc and wipe it over the surface of the card, making sure there is no residue before stamping your image.


    Email:
    gracelivin@juno.com
    Date:
    04/26/2001

    Comments

    I save paper scraps from everywhere--some stores have nice patterned shopping bags, good for backgrounds; colored tissue paper can be embossed on for a neat effect; wallpaper samples are great backgrounds; sometimes magazine ads or catalogs have a vellum sheet with very little printing on it.

    For lower prices on stamps--check auction sites such as e-bay or rubberstampauction.com


    Email:
    lhine@mail.wowmail.com
    Date:
    03/18/2001

    Comments

    Homemade wipes to clean stamps(baby wipes) Get VIVA paper towels, cut in half. have a plastic container with lid. combine 2T of baby wash + 2T of baby oil to 1 1/2 cups of warm water. add to one section of paper towels( looks like a soggy roll of toilet paper) Take out the cardboard middle and wipes will pull out one at a time. These are safe and smell great and only cost pennies.


    Email:
    vitamarie@mindspring.com
    Date:
    03/07/2001

    Comments

    One more lightbox idea: At a yard sale or Home Depot find a "drawer" that is not too deep (utensil size), glue plexiglass on top, cut a hole in one side to insert a light bulb and cord. Drawer pull makes it easy to carry.


    Email:
    tjohnston820star@mindspring.com
    Date:
    02/27/2001

    Comments

    I have made friends with a local printing company who lets me take away any appealing paper left over from other people's jobs, which would otherwise be thrown away. I have all types, colors and weights of paper, most of it high quality. (It helps that I give the company some business from time to time!) Another wonderful source pf material is the dumpster behind a framing shop. I have TONS of mat board from this, both large and small pieces.


    Email:
    marilyn.blackmore@ntlworld.com
    Date:
    12/26/2000

    Comments

    Make a quick and easy rubber stamp for backgrounds and borders by putting rubberbands of differant widths around a wooden block. Try not to overlay them on the inking side, if you want an even effect.


    Email:
    andrea.lacy@xtra.co.nz
    Date:
    10/21/2000

    Comments

    For 3D mounting, go to a picture framer's and ask for off cuts of mounting mats (the coloured card they put around the picture before the frame). You can mount your image and cut right to the edge or leave a margin if thecard colour is appropriate.


    Email:
    Date:
    10/04/2000

    Comments

    Paper Supplier: I use my local newspaper office. They have a great selection of colors and papers and allow me to place fairly small orders. Their prices are also much cheaper than buying prepackaged paper. They will cut to any size and will even score your card stock (although this will cost extra). They give me my scraps as well so I don't waste any of what I have paid for.


    Email:
    jdmj@telusplanet.net
    Date:
    10/04/2000

    Comments

    Rubber Stamp Cleaning Brush: I like to use a denture brush. The large side is good for general cleaning. The pointed side I use for more detailed stamps especially when using metalic inks.


    Email:
    ozhmo@one.net.au
    Date:
    09/01/2000

    Comments

    Instead of doing 3 or 4 layers of the more expensive coloured UTEE, do 2 - 3 layers of clear UTEE then do the last layer with coloured embossing powder. This not only saves you $$$, but it opens up more colour possibilities. - Deb Gray


    Email:
    Date:
    08/16/2000

    Comments

    You can use those Rubbermaid liners in the mesh designs in your card or, lay it under cardstock, roll an inked brayer over it for an interesting design for a background for your card.


    Email:
    NGGHaines@cs.com
    Date:
    07/02/2000

    Comments

    I go to the local home center stores such as Lowe's or Home Depot, in the paint section they have sample cards in a fantastic array of colors, free, and great for layering, some are even marbled, metallic, small pieces - but looks great on cards. Sue Haines NGGHaines@cs.com


    Email:
    melmerby@bellsouth.net
    Date:
    06/03/2000

    Comments

    Cheap stamp cleaner: I use paint edgers (used for painting along ceilings etc.), I keep it in an old take out salad container (from Wendy's) or a TV dinner type plate would work. Just wet the edge pad and rub your stamp over it. Be careful where you do this because the pad may cause the dirty water to spray!


    Email:
    DKsboys@cs.com
    Date:
    05/24/2000

    Comments

    When making scrapbook pages and you want the border a different color, use your paper trimmer to cut out the middle, making a frame. Then glue your white or other color to the frame. Use your cut out middle for the frames of your photographs instead of cutting a brand new sheet.


    Email:
    luvzhorses@wooten.cnchost.com
    Date:
    05/09/2000

    Comments

    Cheapskate fibers: Visit the local thrift store and buy sweaters with fantastic yarns! Take them home and rip them apart while you - watch TV?? I've found tons of nubby, boucle and chenille at less than $2 per sweater. Gives me enough to do tons of projects and very generous RAK's. - - Rae Wooten


    Email:
    gintrere@swbell.net
    Date:
    03/13/2000

    Comments

    I'm very new to stamping but have found a WONDERFUL source for paper. Go to your local paper suppliers and ask them for "Swatch Books". THEY GIVE THEM TO YOU!!! You have rainbows of paper, reams ( LOL ) of different sizes, textures and types of cardstock that can be used for layering. Some of the pieces are large enough to make cards or postcards!! What a find!! Ginni Walker


    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Handmade Rub'nBuff Cream (Sheryl Davis)

    Note: Be sure to use boiled linseed oil as a binder, not raw linseed oil which will not dry after application.

    Add a few drops of "Boiled Linseed Oil" to some metallic powders (such as Pearl Ex or Powdered Pearls), mix to a thick, paste-like consistency. Store in a small jar with a tight fitting lid.

    To use, apply to desired surface with a soft cloth wrapped around your finger or use a cotton swap for smaller areas.


    dollar.gif (126 bytes) "Tinsel" Embossing Powder (Ninfa Castel)

    2 parts clear embossing powder : 1 part glitter 


    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Embossing Fluid (Ninfa Castel)

    1 part glycerin mixed with 2 parts water


    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Blender Pen Solution (alexa/MidniteStamper)

    For 1 ounce bottle fill
    1/3 Glycerine
    2/3 Distilled water
    1/4 teaspoon alcohol

    Put in dropper bottle.
    You can fill Tombows by removing the fine line tip carefully with pliers with a twisting motion. You can even fill the colored ones with this solution to get extra life.

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Shopping
    Discount Stores: WAL-Mart may not have the variety of craft punches an art store does, but I've seen some of the same punches cheaper at WAL-Mart than elsewhere.  Corner punches that were over $10 at a stamping store went for $5.88 (the same Memories Forever brand), and small punches were only $2.88.  Individual paper trimming scissors (Fiskars and other brands, Archival papers, ribbons and lace trims are also plentiful at WAL-Mart. Target also has papers. 

    Warehouse Stores:  SAM'S CLUB is good for some papers and pen sets and paper trimming scissors in sets.

    Office Supply Stores:  Office MAX and Office Depot have some arts & craft supplies, including Fiskars rotary paper trimmers, brass stencils, Prismacolor Pencil sets. -- Christine Gardner

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate "Thick" Tissue
    Not only can you use tissue paper (the kind used in gift bags), but you can iron it to the plastic side of freezer paper for a stiffer version of the paper.  It has a nice effect, because the tissue paper is thin, and somewhat transparent, and you can see some of the white through.  It's also much easier to handle than tissue paper.  You can use solids or small patterns, and can pick it up inexpensively at discount stores.  --Martha Thiemann  (but Donna told me about it)

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Hook and Loop
    To make your own H.A.L.O.S. (Hook and Loop on Stamp) systems, buy hook and loop fastening in fabric store and use inexpensive acrylic picture frames for stamp mounts. Acrylic picture frames are thin enough to cut to size.  Simply score acrylic and snap apart. Cut hook material in thin strips and attach to acrylic.  Attach unmounted stamp to loop material and trim. -- Linda Harris

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Cardstock
    A source of inexpensive paper for those who work or invest in the corporate world:  often the covers of annual reports, insurance and benefits brochures, and folders from vendors and trainers are made of *gorgeous* cardstocks.  Often the back cover is blank, giving you more than enough for a large folded card.  Even those that have printing on one side can be used for layering.  I've found some beautiful and unique papers, both glossy and textured, in a rainbow of colors.  Before I toss
    out the previous year's report, I tear off the covers. --Jane Lorenzen

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Box Templates
    Use really nice boxes as templates to make your own gift boxes. I use a fairly strong white card and then trace the shape of the chosen box onto it. You can marble the shape before you fold and stick it together, or stamp on it to match your card or gift. --Adie

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Colored Crystal Lacquer
    If you want to try the colored Crystal Lacquers & want to save a little $$; get  yourself some of the empty containers (I know VLVS sold them) and put some clear CL in one. Then take your dye reinkers (I use Vivid) and add a TINY bit to the clear Crystal Lacquer.  Gently "mix" it & play!  The ink is very intense, so start with the tiniest amount & go from there! --Georganne C.

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Background Paper
    Go to your local pizza parlour and ask for the white corrugated sheets the place under pizza to prevent it from sweating. They are approx. 12" x 12" and work very well  for use with cards.   If you want different colors just use spray paint. It adds a little body to the paper. Most places will give you the paper for free.--Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Templates
    When buying patterns or shapes for different stamping projects, trace them on cereal box cardboard when needed. I never use my originals that way I always have it.--Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Collage Embellishments
    For collage art work have your favorite pieces of ephemera colored copied so that you always have these treasures. You can usually fit a number of pieces on one sheet. Watch for color copy sales. --Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Almost Leather
    Use fun foam in place of the expensive Almost Leather product.   It works just as well and is much cheaper. --Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate 3-D Mounting Cushion
    Save your rubber trimmings from unmounted stamps for 3D mounting. --Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Travel Backgrounds
    Old recycled postage makes a wonderful background for a travel card. --Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Themed Embellishments
    Check the button section of your local fabric store for wonderful theme buttons. They make wonderful embellishments for cards. If the button has a shank on the back and you find it difficult to remove just punch a small hole in the card and push the shank into the hole and run a toothpick through the opening to keep it in place. If you don't care for the look of the toothpick, line the inside of the card with a sheet of cardstock.--Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate "Manly" Backgrounds
    Sandpaper makes a wonderful background for "manly" cards and it is very cheap.--Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Stamp Cleaner
    For hard to remove permanent ink stains on your stamps try using vegetable oil. Oil will not hurt the rubber and after a few minutes of soaking the permanent ink wipes right off.--Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Gum Arabic
    Fabric Medium found on the top shelf of your acrylic paint section works perfectly with PearlEx as a binder. No need to run out for Gum Arabic. --Jan Williams

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Glitter
    A great way to add glitter to cards is to use the glitter nail polishes that are so popular.  You can even get these at the dollar store or Wal-Mart in tiny bottles.  They work great and dry quick. --Tina Taylor-Stewart

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Metallic Embossing Powder Saver
    To prevent metallic embossing powder from tarnishing over time put a silica pack (you know, one of those little
    silica packets from new shoes) in the jar. It will postpone the embossing powder losing its brilliance. --Pam
    AKA PMstamper

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Detail Embossing Powder
    Put regular embossing powder in a coffee grinder and push the button a few times (so as not to heat it up too much). --Cindy Cade AKA cj

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Colored Glossy Cardstock
    Ink up a brayer really well with dye ink and then run it over glossy white cardstock. Keep inking up the brayer and rolling on the cardstock until the color is even and as dark as you like. --Christine Cox

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Shopping
    There are so many stamping supplies one can buy at a hardware, art or grocery store.

    Hardware stores: foam tape (for 3-D mounting), tack cloth (for cleaning up glitter -- thanks, Barbara), caulk (for paper tole), wood combs (for use with textural paints), Velcro (for mounting UMs, for making a handle on a wood block for ink pads, for indexing UMs), hinges (for making bookettes), paint thinner (for cleaning brushes), Goop (for attaching pin backs to convention pins), etc.

    Grocery stores: ruler, glue stick, crayons (for melting into backgrounds), markers, colored pens, chalk

    Art stores: gum arabic (for working with Pearl Ex), stencils (for sponging), stipple brushes (for blending, stippling and coloring), structural paint (for textural interest), gold leaf (for gilding), faux finish kits, exotic paper, paint brushes --Christine Cox

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Metallic Crystal Lacquer
    If you already own Pearl Ex and some clear Crystal Lacquer you can mix the two to make something that looks just like the new metallic Crystal Lacquer. This tip will only save you money if you already have a stash of the Pearl Ex. If you have to go buy it just for this, buy the metallic Crystal Lacquer. --Georganne C.

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Layered Embossing Shapes
    Instead of buying the cardboard cut-outs use the cardboard from boxes. Also the card that comes in new calendars is also ideal! Lightweight, but strong! --Janine Anderson

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Ultra Fine Glitter
    At Michael's you can get ultra fine glitter called Glitter Sparkles. They don't sparkle in the light as well as the more expensive brands but they are good enough for some applications --Christine Cox

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Iridescent Ultra Fine Glitter
    Also at Michael's you can get a product called Glamour Dust by DecoArt. It is an excellent, ultra, ultra fine iridescent white and holographic glitter. It isn't kept with the other glitters and each Michael's seems to keep it in a different place so you'll have to look for it.

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Tassels
    Supplies:
    - embroidery floss (cheapskates ask their x-stitch friends for the leftovers from projects -- remember to say, "You know, with the dye lots being different, you really can't use that half skein for your next project. ;-)
    - cardboard (cheapskates save boxes for this sort of project)
    - a large eyed needle

    Preparing the Tassel Tool (don't spend too much time on this, it will be destroyed as part of the tassel making procedure:
    1. Cut the cardboard into a rectangle 3" x length you want the tassel.
    2. Cut a 1" x 1/2" horizontal hole near one end of the cardboard. The hole needs to be positioned where you want to band the tassel, and it is important that three sides of the hole be surrounded by at least 1" of cardboard.
    3. Cut a 1/2" slit at the bottom of the cardboard.

    Making the Tassel:
    1. Slide one end of the embroidery floss into the slit to anchor it.
    2. Make as many turns around the cardboard as are needed to create the size tassel you need. Make sure that you take the floss up and over the hole on each turn.
    3. When the tassel is thick enough, slide the embroidery floss into the slit on top of the original strand, then cut. You should now be holding a piece of cardboard that has been circled by embroidery floss.
    4. Thread the large-eyed needle with at least 12" of floss. Use the needle to pull the short piece of floss through the hole and around the wrapped floss. Tie a tight square knot around the wrapped floss, spiral each end of the short piece in turn around the bundle to create the band on the tassel, then run the end down through the center of the bundle.
    5. Thread the large-eyed needle with whatever floss or ribbon you want the tassel to dangle from, and run it along the cardboard through the center of the bundle above the band.
    6. Cut the cardboard and slide the tassel off. Trim to length.

    Suggestions:
    - Mix colors of floss in a tassel.
    - Include metallic thread with the floss.
    - Make the tassel tool larger and make multiple tassels on each tool. -- Stacia
    Schwartz

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate Light Box
    Purchase a plastic storage box from Kmart or Wal-Mart. Get the size above a shoe box but smaller than the larger ones. Purchase a small light fixture, for use under the kitchen counter, in the hardware department of the store. Make sure the bottom of the box does not have ripples, ridges or raised areas. Some brands only have a small dot in the center. Use a finger nail file to remove the dot. Place the light facing up on the table, the box upside down over it and turn on. When you are finished place all of your supplies in the box with the light-cooled off-and take home or store!  -- Chris Behme

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate corrugated paper
    Recycle your light bulb cartons. They make great white corrugated pieces for layering. Or remove the filler from your picture frames. They are the brown corrugated pieces. -- Chris Behme

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate stamp cleaning brush
    Use a plastic hair brush-received with the birth of my baby from
    hospital-for cleaning your stamps. Or use a mushroom brush from a kitchen supply store. The bristles are firm yet soft. They clean the crevices of stamps. -- Chris Behme

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate confetti
    I keep dots created by paper punching on my cards when applying ribbons and use them in shaker cards. You can get a variety of colors or keep them separated. -- Chris Behme

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate cardstock
    Recycle good card stock from greeting cards. I use the unused side and once
    glued down you can never tell it was used.

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) More cheapskate cardstock
    Go to your local print shop and ask if they have any cardstock left over from previous jobs. They'll usually sell it to you really cheap and sometimes they'll even give it away. --Christine Cox

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate wallpaper
    Go to your local wallpaper store and ask them if they have any discontinued sample books. Chances are they'll give it to you for free. Great for envelopes and backgrounds. --Christine Cox

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate sponges
    Buy your white triangular sponges at a beauty supply store because you can get them for a fraction of the price they are sold in rubber stamp or craft stores. Ink only one side of the sponge and, on the other side, write the name or number of the color you are using. You can use the sponge over and over without having to clean "between colors" and the sponge, still well saturated with ink from the last use, doesn't suck your markers dry when you ink it again. --Laurie Gore

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) More cheapskate sponges
    Use cut up kitchen sponges for an interesting, more open texture in sponging. --Laurie Gore

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate background papers
    Save money by making your own patterned papers. Bray ink onto glossy stock and then quickly use an old plastic comb to create different patterns in the ink. Be careful not to press hard and score the paper with the teeth of the comb unless that's what you want to see. Bubble wrap, plastic wrap, and other household items can be used, each with its own unique outcome. How about braying through old window screen? Or pressing garden materials into the wet ink? I have saturated paper, washed it with watercolor, craft acrylics very well diluted, or inks, and sprinkled it with kosher salt. --Laurie Gore

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate fly spots and stamp cleaning
    Old toothbrushes are useful for "fly spotting" and also for cleaning ink out of stubborn little corners of your stamps. --Laurie Gore

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) More cheapskate background paper
    Tissue from gift boxes and bags can be reused, inked, stamped, crumpled, and/or decoupaged in a variety of ways. I've used it in collages and also lining envelopes. I also keep an eye out for interesting images in old magazines that I have picked up at thrift stores. --Laurie Gore

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate samples
    Use the free or $1 craft offers that are listed in some craft magazines. You can use a lot of the items in stamping projects and you may be surprised at the quantities-not chintzy. --Robin

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate embellishments
    Rummage sales are a good source of beads, buttons, and books  (which can be a great source of background papers). --Robin

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate music backgrounds
    Garage sales are also a great source for old music sheets which make wonderful embellishments. --Christine Cox

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate mulberry
    Use a brayer on a used dryer sheet for your own mulberry paper. --Michelle Oswald

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate foam core
    Use washed meat trays instead of foam core for shaker cards. --Michelle Oswald

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate glossy cardstock
    Use the "glossy cardstock" from a new package of pantyhose. --Michelle Oswald

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate alphabet stamps
    Cheap Alphabets (and a great stamping idea)! Go to Wal-Mart or a similar store and get the cheap kid's sets of stamps. You can get one set of 200 stamps (including 2 complete alphabet sets) for 10 dollars.  Have dowel rods cut and blocks cut to fit the stamps (or use HALOS which are much cheaper than wood) then index the blocks and glue everything together. They also make a little rubberstamp alphabet set that comes as a packaged set of 5 for party favors. Mount one set on pencil sized dowel rods just like the others. It makes a really cheap alphabet. --Becky Shook

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate glittered words
    Stamping words with glue/glitter: Use a sponge/brush to brush glue over a word stamp, stamp on your paper and then pour glitter on. Clean brush and stamp immediately! -- Shannon Green

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate templates
    Use different glass shapes (heart, oval, square, round) that are used for etching as templates. These go from .99 to $1.49 at AC Moore & Michael's. -- Alexa AKA Midnite Stamper

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Cheapskate flower drying
    Drying flowers in the microwave without any special equipment. See directions here. -- Christine Cox

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Another cheapskate light box
    A cheap light box for using with your brass stencils is to get a piece of beveled glass (so that you won't cut yourself) and put it on top of two tall soup cans. Put a light bulb attached to a cord under the glass top and it's ready for use. You could use one of those bulbs that people use when working on cars. Even a glass coffee table with an un-shaded lamp under it would work. Be sure to use a low wattage bulb as it might be hard on your eyes. --Mikki (AKA Bagladyann)

    dollar.gif (126 bytes) Yet another cheapskate light box
    Another cheap light box idea is to get a sheet of Plexiglas and put a book at each end. Then put a bright flashlight under the Plexiglas. It works great. Not very convenient to lug around though. --Tammy Couturier